Preparedness without paranoia. It is possibIe?

 

 

 

 

So with recent disasters and revolution, some of us find ourselves feeling ill-at-ease in our once comfortable illusions  of an overly secure existence. The “that won’t happen here, or to me, or to my family” subconscious thought process that we operate on more than we care to admit, for some, has been shaken by the aftershocks, tsunamis and nuclear disaster occurring just across the ocean. For others, there is an utter denial about our own vulnerability and lack of control of the world around us.

So somewhere between the media hype, the denial and the panic, we need to look at what we as citizens can learn from other people’s tragedy and misfortune. While it may be a bit absurd for people to build bunkers and stock up on ammo for the impending zombie apocalypse, it is more than reasonable for those of us on the coast of California to look around and think “hey, we’re on a fault line and right next to a nuclear power plant. Maybe I should have some emergency supplies at the ready in CASE something goes wrong?” Here are eight things you can do to keep yourself safe in the event of a major disaster.

  • Without going overboard, you can keep yourself stocked on some necessary items. It is important to have to canned food and water around, in case things run out, or you’re stuck inside for a while. If you take any kind of prescription medication, it is important to have a surplus on hand.  Extra cans of PBR are always a good idea as well.
  • Depending on what part of the country you live in, it would be a good idea to have some sort of means of creating heat on hand. Blankets, fire wood, etc. They don’t take up much extra space, but a little extra warmth can make a huge difference.
  • Keep the most extensive first aid kit around that you can afford, or have room for. In the event of an earthquake, you never know how badly you and yours could be injured. And while there’s not a whole lot rubbing alcohol can do for a broken bone, and can keep a nasty gash from becoming infected.
  • If you are evacuated form an area near a power plant, it would be helpful to have not only tools in your vehicle, but some of the same things you have in your garage in terms of food/water/heat sources/sleeping and camping goods. It sounds a bit extreme, but really, that sort of thing is more likely to happen than anyone would care to admit.
  • During an earthquake, if you are inside, make sure to stay there. Get underneath a very strong/stable surface. If you are outside, keep clear of objects that could fall or power lines. If you are cooking indoors, be sure to turn of the stove.
  • In the event of a nuclear disaster, only leave your home if you are absolutely certain you have a destination to arrive at, and the means to get there quickly. You don’t want to be stuck in stampede. You’d be safer indoors… provided you’ve stocked up on necessary goods.
  • If you live in a coastal region and survive a major earthquake, it is a good idea to get to higher ground as quickly as possible. A tsunami is likely to follow in the seismic aftermath.
  • If you are driving in an earthquake, be sure to pull over slowly, out of range from power lines and bridges.

While some of these are sort of common sense, it never hurts to have a reminder. We can’t prevent a natural disaster, and we can only try to prevent man made disasters, but we can do our best to avoid personal disaster and loss. If you’re looking for supplies to put in your own personal earthquake kit, come in to Bambu Batu for some sustainable and sturdy camping materials.

 

 

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