Posts Tagged ‘greenhouse’

greenhouse

What could be a more appropriate use for salvaged wood than use in a recycled greenhouse? Once a thriving organism in its own right, timber rescued from wine barrels, barns, old doors and retaining walls can become a shelter for developing seedlings. A Place to Grow | Recycled Greenhouses recognizes the potential in scrapped wood and bestows upon the material a new life as an environmentally conscious greenhouse, shed, or outdoor studio space.

Operated by San Luis Obispo residents Dana and Sean O’Brien, the company prides itself in finding a solution to construction waste and creating beautiful bespoke structures. Dana boasts a finance degree from Cal Poly SLO, over 20 years as a government employee, and an active role in Habitat for Humanity. Sean graduated with a degree in computer science from Cal Poly, has been a software engineer for more than 25 years, and possesses a California contractor’s license. Together, the O’Briens created their business to pursue their passions for eco-friendly building.

A Place to Grow has been honored by the Martha Stewart American Made Contest, and has created greenhouses for Sage nursery in Los Osos and private residences up and down the Central Coast. For more information, contact A Place to Grow through their website, or email Dana at dana@recycledgreenhouses.com.

What could be a more appropriate use for salvaged wood than use in a recycled greenhouse? Once a thriving organism in its own right,timber rescued from wine barrels, barns, old doors and retaining walls can become a shelter for developing seedlings. Based right her on the Central Coast, A Place to Grow recognizes the potential in scrapped wood and bestows upon the material a new life as an environmentally conscious greenhouse, shed, or outdoor studio space.

Operated by San Luis Obispo residents Dana and Sean O’Brien, the company prides itself on finding a solution to construction waste and creating beautiful bespoke structures. Dana boasts a finance degree from Cal Poly SLO, over 20 years as a government employee, and an active role in Habitat for Humanity. Sean graduated with a degree in computer science from Cal Poly, has been a software engineer for more than 25 years, and possesses a California contractor’s license. Together, the O’Briens created their business to pursue their passions for eco-friendly building.

A Place to Grow has been honored by the Martha Stewart American Made Contest, and has created greenhouses for Sage nursery in Los Osos and private residences up and down the Central Coast. For more information, contact A Place to Grow through their website, or email Dana at dana@recycledgreenhouses.com.

Luffa sponge

 

For a lovely lather, nothing beats a luffa. Whether you are washing yourself, your car, or a sink full of dishes, the dried plant makes a fantastic sponge. Organic and free of any synthetic material, the luffa is a great alternative to scrubbers made from foamed plastic polymers (and makes a perfect companion to your trusty bamboo washcloth!) If you have ever wondered how and where these household items are raised, take a trip down to Nipomo’s Luffa Farm. There, you can take a tour of the greenhouse where the plants are grown, view the production process, and meander through the gardens where the herbs for the farm’s bath products are cultivated.

The Luffa Farm began as an informal hobby of the owner who would establish the vines on small plots of land everywhere from Northern California to Missouri. In 1999, she moved down to the Central Coast along with a collection of heirloom luffa seeds. Thinking that she could grow enough to display her luffas at a local drugstore, she began raising luffas in a greenhouse on her property. Once word spread about the quality of her products, curious locals and tourists began to drop in to her farm. She began to offer tours of her operation, and visitors are welcome to learn a little about the luffa two days a week.

The Nipomo Luffa Farm currently grows and harvests over 6,000 luffas every year. The owner promises the softest and most luxurious sponges you have ever felt. The luffas are machine-washable, durable and biodegradable. The Luffa Farm is open to the public Wednesdays and Sundays from 10am to 4pm and located at 1457 Willow Rd. in Nipomo. Products are available for sale at the farm or online.

 

My tomatoes are travel weary.  By the time they reach the salad bowl, they are hundreds of miles away from their original homes.  Moved in trucks, jostled by countless hands, these little fellows have seen their fair share of highways and packaging plants.  Yet, what if there was a way to cut down on the amazing amount of fuel required to haul my salad fixings and the resources used to package them?  A  compromise between the farmers market and large grocery store?

Brightfarms is a company that designs, finances and builds hydroponic greenhouses on the roofs of supermarkets in the effort to reduce shipping and transportation costs and the pollution inherent to moving items along the supply chain.  With investments from such notable Silicon Valley tech moguls as Ali Partovi, Brightfarms has already signed up with eight chains across the country.  Soon, instead of eating lettuce from thousands of miles away, shoppers will be able to pick up veggies in the produce aisle that have traveled only a few hundred feet.

Not only do consumers and the environment benefit from Brightfarm’s greenhouse model, but retailers do as well. By cutting out the middleman, store owners can see higher profit margins by being able to keep fresh produce on the shelves longer.  Risk of damaged goods is reduced with shorter and more gentle deliveries and shorter warehouse storage time.  The owner is able to ensure a more stable price that free from volatile market fluctuations and can confidently advertise the freshness of fruits and vegetables grown on site.

For neighborhoods situated in the middle of “food deserts”, or areas unable to easily access healthy food, greenhouses atop or near markets might be a great way to help provide fresh produce at a low price and aid in the fight against obesity, heart disease and malnutrition.

Could your local supermarket be improved by adding a greenhouse?

 

X