Archive for the ‘Bamboo Products’ Category

Bamboo rhizomes resist containment

There’s an old saying among seasoned bamboo growers. “The first year it sleeps, the second year it creeps, and the third year it leaps.” Those wanting a quick spreading hedge or grove in their backyard might be disappointed with their new stand of bamboo after the first 6 to 12 months. But it won’t be long before they’re running for their chainsaws and pick axes, desperate to curtail an out-of-control root system.

So before you plant that super sustainable renewable grass specimen in your garden, you’ll need to have a clear strategy for bamboo containment. And if it’s already too late, and the clump you planted just two or three years ago is already running amok, then you’ll want to consider some effective methods of bamboo abatement and eradication.

Or worse yet, maybe your neighbor went gung-ho a few years back after an inspiring trip to the home and garden show (or a quick glance at this rousing article on the best bamboo varieties). And now his short-sighted dream of a Japanese garden is turning into a nightmare of bamboo rhizomes wreaking havoc on your fence line, your flowers beds, your veggie patch and your sprinkler system. In this case, you’ll want to study up on both topics mentioned above, in addition to possibly signing up for a course on non-violent communication.

When it comes to time make peace with your neighbor, you’re on your own. But this article will help you with the first two issues, and also prevent you from becoming the kind of gardener whose neighbors want to come after them with a bulldozer in the night.

DISCLOSURE: Some of the links in this article are affiliate links. This means that, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a small commission if you click through those links and make a purchase. This helps us meet the cost of maintaining our website and producing great articles.

The Importance of Bamboo Containment

If you’re planting a fast-growing (read: aggressively spreading) bamboo privacy hedge, or one of the popular and massive timber bamboos, and you live in a neighborhood (as opposed to rural farmland), then a good rhizome barrier is absolutely essential.

Here are a couple things you will need to keep in mind. First of all, never underestimate the tenacity of a healthy bamboo plant. Bamboo is a force of nature unlike any other. People like to talk about runners vs. clumpers, but as they mature, all bamboos display the undeniable will to spread out. You can put bamboo into a pot or a barrel, but don’t kid yourself. If there’s a crack in the barrel or a hole in the pot — and surely there is — the bamboo roots will eventually find their way out. And if there’s soil below, the roots will take hold faster than you can say Phyllostachys!

Also know that those little rhizomes have an amazing ability to sniff out a good water supply, especially in a dry climate like California. That means, if you have some bamboo in the ground, and one of your neighbors has a drip irrigation in their herb garden, or they regularly run their sprinkles to keep the lawn green, it’s very likely that your bamboo will send out runners headed straight for that water source.

It’s like the bamboo has a kind of plant ESP. But just wait till those well-watered roots start sprouting up new shoots in the neighbor’s perfect lawn like UFOs (Underground F#@&ing Objects). Don’t expect them to be welcomed with open arms.

And don’t think you can just yank those unwanted sprouts from the soil like a handful of pesky dandelions. It’s not unheard of for people to rent a backhoe or a bulldozer to really clear out an established stand of bamboo. Otherwise, count on spending a few hours with a spade, maybe a pick ax, maybe even a Sawzall (reciprocating saw), to keep those running rhizomes at bay. And you’ll need to do that sort of maintenance at least once or twice a year if you really want to keep your bamboo from getting the upper hand.

How to Contain your Bamboo

After many centuries of man and bamboo butting heads, and bamboo almost always coming out the winner, some brilliant gardener(s) finally devised a virtually impenetrable system of bamboo containment to help keep your grass where it belongs.

Today you can (and should!) buy sheets of extremely durable black polyethylene, about 1.5 mm in thickness, and usually 24″ to 30″ in width. It’s normally available on a roll, anywhere from 25 to 100 feet in length. You might think 24″ is plenty. After all, who wants dig a 3 foot trench all the way around their hedge? But trust me, use at least 30″, you’ll be better off in the long run. Like I said before, never underestimate the perseverance of a bamboo.

The most popular, most effective, tried and true bamboo containing material is available online from Amazon. It’s the DeepRoot Bamboo Barrier, 30″ deep by 100 ft roll. This stuff is nearly invincible, going a serious 2.5 feet underground, and the 100-ft roll gives you enough length to contain a pretty major privacy hedge. Consider it a few hundred bucks well spent on your peace of mind and good neighbor relations.

Another less expensive alternative to consider is Bamboo Shield’s 24″ by 100 foot roll.

Bamboo Shield also offers shorter rolls with deeper coverage to contain the most aggressive bamboo specimens, all available at Amazon. Check out the Bamboo Shield 30″ by 50 foot roll, or the extra heavy duty Bamboo Shield 36″ by 25 foot roll .

How to Remove Bamboo

OK, so it’s already too late. You or your neighbor let some bamboo run free, and now it’s just out of control. Is there an easy way to get rid of it? Well yes, there are ways to get rid of it. But none of them are easy.

First you’ll need to cut it down to the ground, as low as possible. And then start digging. Pull out roots and rhizomes as you go. And keep on digging. If it’s a particularly tenacious variety you may want to reach for a pick ax or a hand saw. If nothing else works, or your back just isn’t up for this type of labor, your best best will be the Sawzall. As the name suggests, these things saw through anything.

The top of the line piece is Makita’s Cordless Recipro Saw Kit, sold complete with saw blades and an extra battery.

Or you could save a few bucks with a similar Dewalt 12 Amp Corded Reciprocating Saw.

In any case, don’t let these tools and cautionary tales frighten you out of planting an amazing grove of bamboo. With proper preparation, these incredible products make it possible for even the suburban gardener to plant an astonishing  stand that the whole neighborhood can enjoy!

Further Reading

To learn more about expert bamboo gardening, check out some of our other popular articles.

How to Grow Bamboo: The Ultimate Guide Running Bamboo: Why would you plant it? Pros and Cons of potted bamboo What’s so great about bamboo? 20 Best Bamboo Gardens in the World

Photo Credit: Bamboo rhizomes resisting containment (Wikipedia)

Best varieties of bamboo

After some 10 or 20 thousand years of cultivation, bamboo’s popularity may in fact be at an all-time high. Of course, 10,000 years ago, there were a lot fewer people around to exchange gardening tips. But it’s also true that more and more people today are recognizing bamboo for its utility, versatility, aesthetic beauty, and all-around sense of good joo-joo.

Though it’s been revered in the Far East for these same qualities for many thousands of years, it’s taken a few extra centuries for this thing of wonder to reach the west and spread like wildfire. Not unlike a few other things I can think of.  Yoga and sushi quickly come to mind.

As if sorting through the options of bamboo toothbrushes and bamboo towels weren’t challenging enough, consider now that if you’re looking to plant a few varieties of bamboo in your garden, you’ll have between 1-2,000 species to choose from. Even the bamboo specialists can’t agree on the actual number of bamboo breeds. But no need to split hairs over speciation. Today we’d like to help you narrow it down to the 10 best bamboo varieties for your garden.

Two Types of Bamboo

Some people like to say that there are types of bamboo: runners and clumpers. Of course, that’s a sweeping generalization, because, like I said, there are really something like 1-2,000 species of bamboo. Not only that, but there are also slow runners and aggressive clumpers, and a number of other factors that could affect the growth habit of your bamboo. Having said that, this still remains the simplest way to think of bamboos.

RUNNERS

Most bamboos are runners, meaning that they send out rhizome roots racing underground in pursuit of moisture and elbow room. If you’re looking to plant a privacy hedge that will spread quickly along a fence line, or you just enjoy watching a voracious plant as it wields its dominion over the landscape, then this is the way to go. They also tend to be the easiest to find, especially at non-specialist nurseries, because they do propagate so easily.

But be careful, and think before you plant. The old adage about bamboo says that, “The first year they sleep, the second year they creep, and the third year they leap.” In other words, you might not think it’s a runner after the first year, but by the third or forth year, you almost certainly will, and so will your neighbors.

Running bamboos have no respect for property lines. If the neighbor to the one side is regularly sprinkling his perfectly manicured lawn, or the neighbor on the other side is constantly irrigating her prize-winning rose bushes, it won’t take long (especially in a dry place like California) for those eager rhizomes to sniff out those delicious water sources and wreak havoc on the roses, the lawn, the vegetable patch, the herb garden, and pretty much everything in sight. There goes the neighborhood!

So how do you avoid this un-neighborly catastrophe? Here are a few options:

Allow your running bamboo plenty of room to spread. If you’re gardening in a tightly-squeezed suburban subdivision, then you probably will not have plenty of room. If you’re trying to fill out and green up some vacant acreage, then that’s more like it. Keep you bamboo well-contained. There are a number of ways to do this, ranging from a simple solution like planting into a old wine barrel (or half barrel) to burying any manner of rhizome barrier into the ground. Just remember, with time and pressure, there’s almost nothing that stop those roots from spreading. So whatever you put into the ground, plant it thick and deep. (Check out our tips on bamboo containment.) Get your hands dirty and prune your bamboo regularly. That means not only trimming back the shoots, but going underground and cutting back those vigorous roots. Look for smaller and slower running bamboos, like some of the ground cover varieties. But keep an eye on them. Sometimes they look sleepy on the surface, even while the roots are constructing an invisible empire underground. Find some clumping bamboo and plant those instead.

The fact is, many of the most interesting and attractive bamboo species are runners. They also tend to be less expensive and easier to find in nurseries. So now that you’ve been warned, here are a few great bamboo varieties to look for.

Phyllostachys vivax

You’ll definitely want to allow some extra space for this tremendous timber bamboo that easily reaches 20 to 50 feet in height, with culms up to 4 or 5 inches in diameter. As you can imagine, it will also have a pretty massive footprint. But for anyone who’s got the space for it, this majestic grass could be a prized specimen and the envy of bamboo enthusiasts all around.

I planted one of these in my suburban backyard in San Luis Obispo, and kept it in a 15 gallon pot for fear of it overtaking the neighborhood. After 5 or 6 years it never looked unhealthy, but it sure never reached the kind of stature described above. It really needs room to spread out.

As mentioned above, it’s a pretty good idea to keep your running bamboo in a pot or container. But this is not the perfect solution. If you place the pot on the dirt, the roots will eventually crawl through the drain hole and get into the ground. Better to put the pots on a patio or a large stepping stone in the garden.

And if you do manage to contain your running bamboo, be aware, it will never reach full size. This is especially the case with a timber bamboo. In ideal conditions, the Vivax plant is a magnificent thing to behold. But in a pot it will just sort of languish. So unless you have a great deal of space, there’s not much point in trying to grow a running timber bamboo in a pot.

For best results, plant your Vivax in the ground, but also surround it with a strong root barrier. Give it a wide berth, room to spread at least 8 to 10 feet in diameter. Then bury your root barrier nice and deep. And check up on it regularly. Left unchecked, a running timber bamboo can tear through your industrial root barrier.

Semiarundinaria fastuosa

Another very impressive variety, its regal appearance has earned this one the nickname of “Temple Bamboo.” It’s a catchy name, and also MUCH easier to pronounce! Temple Bamboo bamboo can get to be 20 or 30 feet in height, but its richly colored culms don’t grown much larger than an inch or so in diameter.

I also planted one of these in a 15 gallon container, but it didn’t take long to break out and proliferate around the yard. But with such handsome shoots, I just couldn’t bring myself to uproot them. This really is a beautiful species of bamboo, with its long, straight, elegant canes.

Even though my Temple Bamboo got into the ground, it never seemed to get really out of control.  After 5 or 6 years, the plant was still only about 5 feet in diameter, and less than 10 feet tall. Perhaps if we lived somewhere warmer and rainier, it would have grown more aggressively.

Also, I rarely fed this plant anything more than an annual serving of compost from our own garden. We had very sandy soil conditions, not so rich in nutrients. But the advantage was in how easily I could dig into the sand and prune the roots. I would do this regularly, because people would often admire the beauty of this plant and ask for a cutting.

Phyllostachys nigra (black bamboo)

The distinctively dark brown (not quite black) shoots make this one of the most popular strains of bamboo, and any nursery that sells bamboo is likely to have some of this on hand. As the plant matures, the dark color of the culms grows richer, making for a very attractive contrast against the bright green leaves.

Native to the Hunan Province of southern China, gardeners now cultivate black bamboo all over the world. Although it thrives best in its own subtropical habitat, it can grow very well in USDA zones 7-10. If planted in rich, loamy soil, black bamboo can get 20 to 30 feet tall with mature culms of 2″ in diameter.

A healthy specimen can easily act as the centerpiece in a garden, with its distinctly dark canes, and its billowing foliage. Once harvested and dried, black bamboo is also excellent to work with. The richly-colored poles lend themselves to any number of decorative uses, from fencing to furniture.

Pseudosasa japonica (arrow bamboo)

Also quite popular, arrow bamboo earned its name from its long, strong, straight poles, which Samurai warriors once used to make arrows. Today it’s a great choice for planting in shady corners of the garden. Also, though technically classified as a runner, it has a far more restrained growth habit than most bamboos of that class. The broad green leaves make this a very vibrant and attractive specimen.

Arrow bamboo is an excellent candidate for privacy screens as it grows thick and dense. Its height, usually about 12 to 16 feet, makes it more manageable as well. An especially good choice for privacy hedges with height restrictions.

This variety does need to be well watered. If you’re in a dry climate like Southern California, arrow bamboo will not be your best choice. Try to keep it in a shady area that gets a lot of water run off.

Dwarf Green Stripe

One of the few bamboos that can be cultivated as a ground cover, this specimen makes an excellent accent alongside larger bamboo varieties, around Japanese pines, and in any sort of Asian themed garden setting. Its compact size also makes it much easier to contain, despite its being a runner. Just keep an eye on those roots!

Unlike other striped varieties of bamboo, this one has stripes on its leaves rather than it canes. They are bright yellow with a deep green variegation. The more sunlight it gets, the lighter the yellow becomes, turning almost white. The green culms are barely thicker than a blade of grass, and rarely grow more than 2 or 3 feet tall.

Dwarf green stripe is a fairly cold hardly species, but it may look less vibrant during a cold winter. Some gardeners will mow it back in the winter. When it comes back in the spring, it’s even thicker and more colorful than before.

CLUMPERS

While the most impressive varieties of bamboo tend to be runners, the conscientious gardener is always on the look out for a good breed of clumping bamboo. They might not always display the awesome meter-a-day growth of some fabled bamboos of the tropics, or the massive culms that make you want to reach out your arms for a bear hug, but they can lend an exotic charm to any small scale zen oasis or Japanese garden.

Now before you rush over to Home Depot, or your nearest box store discount nursery, and start asking sales clerks for their recommendations on clumping bamboos, keep in mind that very few people — nursery employees included — can reliably distinguish a runner from a clumper. And as long as clumpers remain more expensive, more sought after, and harder to come by, it’s easy to imagine how unreliable certain sales people could be.

With that in mind, I’d like to recommend a couple of my favorite bamboo nurseries in California: Bamboo Sourcery in Sebastopol and Bamboo Giant near Santa Cruz. These guys really know their bamboo. But if you want my opinion, here are a few of my favorite clumpers.

Bambusa oldhamii

An old favorite, Oldhamii is said to be the most widely grown variety of bamboo in all of the United States. You might say it’s an old standard. Native to Taiwan, it does have a preference for the tropical climes and is not very cold hardy. But with shoots reaching up to 60 feet or more (under ideal conditions) and growing up to about 4 inches in diameter, it’s certainly an impressive specimen, particularly for a clumper. You’d have to agree, it’s an oldie but a goodie!

Oldhamii is also a popular choice for a privacy hedge, with its bushy leaves and dense, upright canes. The thick poles make an excellent building material, too. And many bamboo enthusiasts will eat the sweet, young shoots of this variety. With so many uses, it’s hard to think of a reason NOT to plant a grove of Oldhamii.

Otatea acuminata (Mexican Weeping Bamboo)

With its slender stalks and delicate, wispy leaves, this delightfully compact specimen looks good in nearly any garden. All it needs is a gentle breeze to make it really come alive. It also prefers warmer climates. I grew some in a cool, coastal climate, and it always looked happy.

A versatile species, this bamboo does well in a variety of conditions. Near the ocean, it’s not bothered by the salty sea spray. In California, it can tolerate the dryness. It’s native to Northern Mexico, after all. But it’s also cold hardy down to about 20º F. And in small gardens, the weeping bamboo does quite well in a pot.

The thin poles grow up to 10 or 15 feet tall, but the gracefully cascading leaves are what give the plant its unique appeal.

Buddha’s Belly (subspecies of Bambusa vulgaris)

With a catchy named derived from the bulbous shape of its internodes, Buddha’s Belly is one of the easiest species to recognize and one of the largest varieties of clumping bamboo. Some poles also grow zigzag instead of upright. But whatever it lacks in straight and narrow poise, it more than makes up for with portly character. This subtropical variety also does better in the warmer zones.

The most common variety of Buddha Belly is the Bambusa ventricosa, which gets about 30 feet tall with 2 to 3 inch culms. Giant Buddha Belly can grow up to 45 feet tall, with the entire clump spreading to about 15 feet in width. Perhaps the most beautiful variety is the Yellow Buddha Belly Bamboo (Bambusa ventricosa kimmei) which puts up green shoots that gradually turn yellow and take an lovely striped effect.

There’s also a dwarf variety which stays more short and compact. This one is especially suitable for bonsai purposes.

To encourage the culms to bulge out and make the distinctive Buddha Belly shape more pronounced, gardeners have a few tricks. It’s important to prune the bamboo at least once a year. By preventing the plant from growing upward, it will tend to grow a more outward and zigzagged. Also, a little water deprivation can cause just enough stress to make more bulbous culms. If too many of your culms are not looking belly-like, try watering it once a week instead of twice a week, or maybe even less.

See our in-depth article on Buddha Belly Bamboo for more details.

Alphonse Karr

Exquisitely elegant, this variety is easy to recognize with its green and yellow racing stripes. Even amidst a great collection of bamboos, this one is sure to stand out. In ideal conditions, it can get up to 20 feet, and the culms grow to about 1 inch in diameter.

Although slower growing, Alphonse Karr is a popular choice for hedging because of its attractive poles. To accentuate the colorful stripes, try pruning back all the leaves from the bottom 3 feet or so of the plant.

Native to the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Alphonse is much happier in warm climates. Avoid planting it in USDA zone below 7 or 8.

Himalayacalamus hookerianus (Himalayan Blue)

The richly colored, powdery blue culms give this bamboo an especially attractive appearance. Indigenous to the mountains of China, it also does better in warmer and subtropical regions. But it grows especially well around ponds and in containers. Culinary tip: fresh shoots of the Himalayan Blue are edible and are said to be quite tasty. Anyone for stir fry?

Conclusions

Before you decide which bamboo to plant in your garden, you’ll need to consider how much space you have and what you are trying to achieve. Do you want something compact and decorative? Or are you looking for something that will spread quickly and provide a lot of privacy? Or maybe you’re growing bamboo for the canes, and you have a construction project in mind.

Based on your needs, you can select a runner or a clumping variety, something short or something tall. And then plant it in the appropriate spot in your garden. Or, better yet, choose a few different varieties of bamboo, and create beautiful space that brings many pleasing characteristics together.

And once you’ve finished selecting and planting your bamboo varieties, you might consider adding a bamboo fountain somewhere for an added sense of zen. Then it’s just a matter of sitting quietly and waiting for the breeze to come through, rustling the leaves and knocking the canes.

I hope you’ve found these suggestions helpful. If you have a favorite bamboo that we were unable to include in this short list, go ahead and let us know in the comments section. Meanwhile, happy gardening!

By the way, if you found this interesting and informative, be sure to take a look at out some of our other stimulating articles.

Growing Bamboo: The complete how-to guide The best bamboo varieties for construction

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

 

Bamboo reading glasses from Blue Planet eyewear

A New Year has just begun, and what better time than now to see things from a new point of view? Why not look at the world through a fresh pair of sunglasses or readers fashioned in beautiful, renewable bamboo from Blue Planet Eyewear!

This eco-friendly line of eyewear, available locally at Bambu Batu, comes in a variety of materials to suit your conscious lifestyle. But, of course, we are big fans of the bamboo frames. Here in sunny San Luis Obispo, it’s important to have at least one reliable pair of shades, and these bamboo sunglasses strike a flattering look. Drop by the shop to see which style looks best on you.

Also, for those of you who spend a lot of time reading or in front of a screen, you’re going to love our newest addition, the bamboo readers! Again, these come in multiple styles, for both men and women. So come in and see for yourself.

And if you’re interested in other eyewear made from certified wood and recycled materials, you can check out Blue Planet Eyewear. The world of sustainable options will never look the same!

 

 

 

Boody Wear

Boody call!

Are you still looking for the most comfortable and ecologically responsible undergarments known to man and woman? So were we, but it looks like we’ve found them: Boody Wear.

Here at Bambu Batu, we never stop striving to find the best bamboo options on the market. That’s how we’ve stayed in business for ten years now and counting. That’s also how we discovered such favorites at the deluxe bamboo towels from Daisy House and the 100% bamboo sheets from Bed Voyage.

And now we are delighted to announce a new day in the world of bamboo panties. In the interest of full disclosure, I should say that my wife discovered and purchased a pair of Boody Wear classic bikini panties at a health food store up in the Santa Cruz mountains. After having tried out a dozen different brands and styles of bamboo undies over the past decade, she was quickly convinced and these became her new favorites.

So we now carry those bikini briefs and several other styles of women’s bamboo undies from Boody Wear, as well as three different styles of leggings (another personal favorite) and a wide variety of tank tops, camisoles and undershirts. Boody also makes a couple styles of men’s bamboo underwear—both boxers and briefs—and some exceedingly comfortable and well-made bamboo socks. And like my wife, many of our customers are quickly becoming addicted to Boody’s superior softness and quality fit.

If you’re looking to enjoy the comfort of bamboo, with softness where it really counts, I invite you to come on in to Bambu Batu and peruse our undergarments. (Yes, I really said that!) But be careful, you might get hooked.

Panda Poo Paper

Here at Bambu Batu, we are determined to build a better, more sustainable world from the bottom up. Of course, we also enjoy our fair share of wise cracks! But our Panda Poo Paper products are no joke. We looked high and low, extending our search to the ends of the earth, to source this incredible tree-free alternative to your ordinary, timber-based stationery.

Straight from the belly of the beast, these unique journals and note pads are truly fashioned from 100% Panda Bear excrement. Naturally, your gut reaction may be one of distaste. But before you turn up your nose in high-and-mighty disapprobation, let us consider the diet of the venerable Chinese mascot.

Like us, the Pandas have a great fondness for bamboo. You might even call it an obsession, for in fact, these exquisite creatures sustain themselves entirely on this hardy grass. Only extremely rarely do they consume anything else.* And what goes in, must come out, so what we’re really talking about is simply bamboo paper, processed nature’s way, by the highly specialized enzymes found only in the digestive tract of the Panda. Alimentary, my dear Watson!

That’s right, it’s more than just a political statement, it’s an environmental movement. So hurry down to Bambu Batu and get yourself a piece of the action, because it’s hardly any exaggeration to say that this shit is flying out of here!

(*NOTE: the variety of bamboo preferred by the bears is not the same variety as that used in making bamboo products like flooring, clothing, cutting boards etc., so these products pose no threat to the endangered panda’s livelihood.)

Charley Younge

Charley Younge, a true pioneer in the field of bamboo products, passed away this week (May 17, 2015). For four decades Charley invigorated the sustainable building industry, as an enthusiastic promoter and advocate for bamboo, and a successful innovator who branded bamboo as a modern material.

Charley Younge is regarded as the pioneer of modern bamboo decorating products in Europe. As early as the 1970s, Younge was actively engaged with bamboo and earned an international reputation for his knowledge about the bamboo plant, its development and its versatility. Younge will also be remembered for founding the Dutch Bamboo Information Center (BIC), which has been largely responsible for bamboo’s widespread success in Europe.

In 1993 Younge began selling bamboo flooring in Europe under the trademark of PLYBOO® which he himself developed. Three years earlier, the first bamboo flooring in Europe had already been laid. That flooring remains to this day, and to their full satisfaction, in the home of the Younge family in Schellinkhout, Netherlands.

Charley lives on in our memory, in our hearts, and in bamboo floors, countertops and kitchenwares across Europe and around the world. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family. And with all due respect, let us remember the old adage: Only the good die Younge!

(Thanks to Susanne Lucas, one of North America’s greatest bamboo advocates, for the factual details of this article.)

Eco Fashion Show 2015

It’s Memorial Day Weekend, and San Luis Obispo’s natural fiber fashionistas know what that means. The 5th annual Eco Fashion Show is just days away, taking place at the Odd Fellows Hall at 520 Dana St., on Friday May 29, at 6:30 pm. A yearly fundraiser to benefit Humankind Fair Trade, a non-profit gift shop on Monterey Street, this year’s Eco Fashion Fashion will feature several local purveyors of fine organic and re-used apparel.

Of course, no SLO Eco Fashion Show would be complete without showcasing outfits from Bambu Batu, Hemp Shak and Maule Wear, pillars of our local natural fibers community. Live Local Apparel will also be on the scene with their locally inspired and locally produced t-shirts and caps. Second hand clothiers like Curio, Ruby Rose, Threads and Castaways will also take part, touting the ecological benefits of used clothing. Re-use and reduce! A new addition this year, Eco Bambino will be representing the fashion trends for the little ones.

Good-looking models have been recruited from the community to show off five outfits from each participating business. Bambu Batu will feature a number of new styles, including our top-selling Felicity Dress, as well as other perennial favorites for men and women.

Be sure to stop by and see what else is new this season in the world in the eco fashion. Tickets are $15 in advance, or $20 at the door, and proceeds benefit Humankind Fair Trade, a non-profit shop that provides income to artisans and farmers in the developing world. Also check out the vendor fair before the show, and don’t miss the silent auction, with some exceptionally nice gifts from each of the participating businesses.

best bamboo clothing store

When Bambu Batu, the House of Bamboo, opened nine years ago (yes, our birthday is coming up on Feb.20), we were the only shop anywhere to offer such a wide variety of bamboo clothing. In 2006, the bamboo clothing industry was still in its earliest stage of infancy. Nobody walking into Bambu Batu had ever seen bamboo clothing before. Seeing the looks on people’s faces when they touched a bamboo towel or a pair of bamboo socks for the first time was truly delightful.

Now it’s 2015, and our selection of bamboo clothing is more impressive than ever, as we continue to offer the widest variety of bamboo products of any store in the land. Those who scoffed at us when we first opened our doors on Grand Avenue in Grover Beach, writing off bamboo sheets and shirts as a passing novelty, have been proven wrong. And conversely, those who love the feeling and wearability of bamboo clothing and clamored for more of it, have all been richly rewarded.

Today the selection of brands and colors and weaves of bamboo fabrics and textiles is more diverse and higher in quality than ever before. Just look at the variety of bamboo towels out there! But in spite this growth and progress, the mission and purpose here at Bambu Batu has not changed one iota.

We remain committed to providing the best quality natural fiber clothing and textiles, made in accordance with the highest standards of fair labor practices, at the most reasonable prices. Unlike a lot of bamboo clothiers who have jumped on the bandwagon in recent years, seeing an opportunity in a growing market, charging prices that keep bamboo clothes out of reach for the average middle class family, Bambu Batu remains a family-owned business that makes the relationships with our customers a top priority.

Greenington Bamboo Bed

You might not spend your spring vacation in a chateau in the south of France, and maybe you don’t serve caviar for lunch, and you probably don’t have a team of serfs to carry you to and from the tennis courts in your covered sedan, but when it comes time to lie down and rest after a long, hard day, you too can experience the luxury of bamboo sheets. So soft and comfortable, they are fit for a king.

 

Sleeping on bamboo sheets from Bambu Batu, you’ll know how it feels to lie down in the lap of luxury, like a guest in the royal chambers. Anyone who has ever had the pleasure knows what I mean. And once you’ve been spoiled, it’s hard to go back. Soon you’ll be waking up expecting the servants to stroll in with silver platters and breakfast in bed. You might even find yourself mumbling in your magnificent sleep, phrases like “Let them eat cake,” or “L’etat c’est moi.” Yes, the royal treatment make take some getting used to, but when you wake up glowing like the Queen of Sheba, you’ll thank yourself for it.

You can’t put a price on the value of a good night’s sleep, the kind of sleep you get with a quality mattress or a set of bamboo sheets. Waking up refreshed, starting your day on the right foot, after a sumptuous sleep, there’s no better way to rise and shine. You’re more likely to spend your day feeling, positive, enthusiastic, confident and generous. In fact, you’re likely to want to share the sensation with your friends. Whether that means inviting them over to spend the night, or simply gifting them the special treat of a new set of bedding. Either way, you know that they’ll feel flattered, pampered and eternally grateful.

At Bambu Batu, we’ve been carrying bamboo sheets since 2006, so we know it’s more than just a passing fad, and we know it’s a product that sells itself. For softness, temperature regulating, and all-around nocturnal comfort, nothing can match the splendor of bamboo sheets. Our customers know it too, and after this many years they know they can count on us for the highest quality and most reasonable prices for anything bamboo. So shop online or stop by in person; either way, you’ll be glad you did.

Bamboo Sheets and Blankets

In addition to these luxurious bamboo sheet sets, which come in a wide variety of colors, Bambu Batu also offers beautiful 100% bamboo coverlets and bamboo duvet covers.

Bamboo Gifts

You better not pout, you better not cry, but if you did I’d say that I understand why. For those of us who lack such time-saving devices as a team of uber-industrious elves or a jug of high-octane reindeer fuel, it can be a daunting if not insurmountable challenge to get all the gingerbread men properly decorated, the freshly cut Doug fir thoroughly tinseled, and every stocking hung by the chimney with care.

But at least when it comes time to stuff those stockings with thoughtful, meaningful treasures that have been produced ethically and without exploitation of the Earth or her inhabitants, Bambu Batu has a few bamboo gift ideas to help ease your holiday shopping while adroitly avoiding such dreaded pitfalls as the Walmart parking lot catastrophe or the Best Buy customer service fail.

So without further ado, here’s our Top Eight list of items under $20 for this holiday season.

#1. One of our all-time most popular items, the re-usable and indispensable bamboo spork. Arm yourself for a power lunch, and proper picnic or a simple appetizer… this one tool does it all. Available with or without the handsome cork carrying case.

#2. You may not be so traditional as to roast your own chestnuts, but don’t let that stop you from enjoying an open fire. Even the smallest of fires—produced from the non-toxic wick of an eco-friendly and naturally scented beeswax candle from Big Dipper Wax Co.—can be a genuine pleasure this time of year.

#3. Can’t think of anything more creative than an entirely utilitarian personal hygiene item? Yes, toothbrushes are a welcome addition to every stocking. So how about a bamboo toothbrush from Smile Squared? For every toothbrush purchased, another is donated to child in the developing world who needs one. Win-win!

#4. In the spirit of less-than-original stocking stuffers, don’t forget to stock up on bamboo socks and underwear, and start 2015 on the right foot!

#5. Another great gift for the avid traveler, or anyone who likes to eat on the go, the travel utensil set from To-Go Ware eliminates the need for disposable plastic ware, and adds a touch of class to every impromptu take out dining session, with bamboo fork, knife, spoon and even a durable pair of chopsticks.

#6. For purposes of personal pampering, it doesn’t get much better than a fluffy soft bamboo washcloth from Daisy House. Savor the sumptuous luxury of a super absorbent face cloth with the finest bamboo towels on the market. (Named best overall towel by the Wall Street Journal!)

#7. As a Bambu Batu customer, we know you care about shopping local, so don’t forget to pick up a few bars from Poppy Soap Co., handmade with love by Lindy LaRoche of Los Osos, available in eight remarkable recipes.

#8. I almost forgot the most import thing about holiday giving: the children! Spoil your little ones with a new set of bamboo pajamas from Yala, just about the most snuggly things on earth.

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